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If First Parish Church has played a role in your past, you can play a role in its future.

Remember First Parish in your estate plans by:

Remember First Parish Church

  • Making an outright gift of cash to First Parish Church, appreciated stock(s), or property. The benefits of your gift can be used immediately and you may receive tax benefits.
  • Naming First Parish Church as a beneficiary in a life insurance policy, IRA, Keogh Plan or Charitable Gift Fund (Donor Advised fund).
  • Setting up a Gift Annuity. A gift of cash or stocks is made, and you receive income for life (interest rate is based on your age at the time the gift is made).  Upon your death, the remaining principal goes to the church.  Gift Annuities can be managed by the UCC Financial Development Ministry (800-846-6822).  They will produce an illustration based on the amount of the gift and your age.  The Ministry currently manages Gift Annuities totaling almost $15 million.  Similar services are available at the Maine Community Foundation (877-700-6800).
  • Naming First Parish Church in your will, either a specific amount or a percentage of your estate, or a residual portion after specific bequests have been made to others.
  • Considering several other approaches such as Pooled Income Funds, Charitable Remainder Trusts, Charitable Remainder Annuity Trusts, Revocable Trusts, and Charitable Lead Trusts.

 

Suggestions for the next steps

 
  1. Meet with your financial advisor and attorney to review your individual tax and legal questions.
  2. If you wish to make a significant gift to the church, meet with the Senior Pastor to discuss your personal aims and learn more about First Parish  Church’s needs. 
  3. Speak with the Treasurer of First Parish Church for suggestions on the wording of your gift or bequest so it is directed to the correct fund and is used according to your intention.
  4. Be sure to have a will.  “No, you can’t take if with you.  And without certain precautions, you can’t even leave it behind.”
  5. If you have a will, you may want to update it to reflect:
  • Family changes
  • Changes in your location, since laws vary from state to state
  • Changes in the value of your estate
  • Tax law changes
  • Changes in your benevolent desires